Dental Implant Cement vs Screw: Which Is The Better Option?

Among the array of options available, two predominant techniques stand out: cement-retained and screw-retained implants. 

These approaches represent distinct philosophies in dental restoration, each carrying its own set of advantages and considerations for both patients and practitioners. 

By understanding the nuances of these attachment methods, individuals can make informed choices that align with their unique dental needs and preferences.

Dental Implant Cement vs Screw

What are Cement Dental Implants?

Cement dental implants, also known as cement-retained implants, utilize dental cement to secure the prosthetic crown onto the implant abutment. 

This method involves the fabrication of a crown that is cemented onto the implant abutment after it has been precisely positioned within the jawbone. 

According to a study published in the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, cement-retained implants are widely used in dental practice, comprising approximately 63% of all implant-supported prostheses.

Cement Dental Implants Characteristics:

CharacteristicsDescription
Attachment MethodCrown is cemented onto the implant abutment.
StabilityProvides excellent stability and support for the prosthetic crown.
AestheticsOffers seamless integration with natural teeth, providing natural-looking results.
MaintenanceRequires professional intervention for crown removal and potential restoration replacement.
Risk of ComplicationsPotential for cement residue accumulation, leading to inflammation or peri-implantitis.
Clinical ConsiderationPrecise cement application is crucial to avoid excess cement seepage and associated complications.

Cement dental implants are a popular choice for restoring missing teeth due to their stability, aesthetic appeal, and seamless integration with natural dentition.

However, they require careful maintenance and precise cement application to mitigate the risk of complications such as peri-implantitis.

How Do Cement Dental Implants Work?

Cement dental implants, also referred to as cement-retained implants, involve a specific process for attachment and functionality:

  1. Implant Placement: The first step involves the surgical placement of the dental implant into the jawbone by a qualified oral surgeon or periodontist.
    This implant serves as a replacement for the natural tooth root and provides a stable foundation for the prosthetic crown.

  2. Abutment Placement: Once the implant has integrated with the surrounding bone tissue through a process called osseointegration.
    Healing abutment or temporary abutment is placed on top of the implant.
    This abutment helps shape the gum tissue and prepares it for the final restoration.

  3. Impression Taking: After the gum tissue has healed, an impression of the implant site and adjacent teeth is taken to fabricate a custom-made dental crown.
    This impression ensures that the crown fits precisely onto the implant abutment and blends seamlessly with the patient’s natural dentition.

  4. Crown Fabrication: Using the impression as a guide, a dental laboratory fabricates a prosthetic crown that matches the color, shape, and size of the patient’s natural teeth.
    The crown is typically made from materials such as porcelain or ceramic to provide durability and aesthetic appeal.

  5. Cementation: Once the crown is ready, it is cemented onto the implant abutment using dental cement.
    The dentist carefully places the crown onto the abutment, ensuring proper alignment and fit.
    Excess cement is removed, and the cementation process is completed.

  6. Final Adjustments: After cementation, the dentist makes any necessary adjustments to ensure proper occlusion (bite) and aesthetics.

Cement dental implants offer a reliable and aesthetically pleasing solution for replacing missing teeth. 

However, it is essential to follow proper protocols during the placement and cementation process to minimize the risk of complications and ensure long-term success.

How to Know if You Need Cement Dental Implants

Determining the suitability of cement dental implants involves several considerations that are typically assessed during consultation with a dental professional:

  1. Bone Health: Adequate bone volume and density are essential for the successful placement and stability of dental implants.
    X-rays and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans are commonly used to evaluate bone quality and quantity in the jawbone.

  2. Tooth Replacement Needs: Cement dental implants are suitable for individuals who require single-tooth replacement or multiple teeth in non-load-bearing areas.
    They are often recommended for restoring aesthetics in the smile zone, where stability and natural appearance are paramount.

  3. Gum Tissue Condition: Healthy gum tissue is crucial for the long-term success of dental implants.
    Patients with periodontal disease may require treatment to address gum inflammation and infection before undergoing implant placement.

  4. Overall Oral Health: Comprehensive oral health assessment, including evaluation of oral hygiene habits.
    Existing dental restorations, and systemic health conditions, helps determine the suitability of dental implants.
    Patients with uncontrolled diabetes, autoimmune disorders, or certain medications may require additional precautions.

  5. Patient Preferences: Some patients may prefer the convenience and ease of maintenance offered by cement dental implants, while others may opt for screw-retained implants for their retrievability.

  6. Treatment Goals: Discussing treatment goals and desired outcomes with the patient allows the dental team to tailor the treatment plan accordingly.
    Factors such as cost, treatment timeline, and aesthetic preferences play a role in the decision-making process.

By considering these factors in conjunction with a thorough examination and diagnostic imaging, dental professionals can determine whether cement dental implants are the most appropriate solution for addressing a patient’s tooth replacement needs.

What is a Screw Dental Implant?

A screw dental implant, also known as a screw-retained implant, is a type of dental implant that utilizes a screw mechanism to secure the restoration to the implant fixture. Here are key points to understand about screw dental implants:

  • Implant Design: Screw dental implants consist of two main components: the implant fixture, which is surgically placed into the jawbone, and the abutment, which connects the implant fixture to the dental restoration.

  • Attachment Method: Unlike cement-retained implants, which use dental cement to bond the restoration to the implant.
    Screw dental implants employ a screw mechanism to attach the restoration securely.
    This allows for easier retrieval and maintenance of the restoration if necessary.

  • Versatility: Screw-retained implants offer versatility in terms of restoration types and materials.
    They can accommodate various prosthetic options, including single crowns, bridges, and overdentures.
    Making them suitable for a wide range of tooth replacement needs.

  • Stability and Retention: The screw mechanism provides excellent stability and retention for the dental restoration, minimizing the risk of displacement or loosening over time. This ensures long-term durability and functionality of the implant-supported restoration.

  • Accessibility for Maintenance: One of the advantages of screw dental implants is their accessibility for maintenance and repairs.
    Because the restoration is attached using screws, it can be easily removed by the dental professional if adjustments or repairs are needed.

  • Clinical Considerations: Screw dental implants require precise placement and accurate torque application during installation to ensure optimal stability and function.
    Additionally, proper oral hygiene practices and routine dental visits are essential for maintaining the health of the implant and surrounding tissues.

Understanding the features and benefits of screw dental implants allows patients and dental professionals to make informed decisions regarding tooth replacement options based on individual needs and preferences.

AspectScrew Dental Implants
Implant DesignConsists of implant fixture and abutment
Attachment MethodUtilizes screw mechanism for restoration
VersatilityAccommodates various restoration types
StabilityProvides excellent stability and retention
AccessibilityAllows for easy removal and maintenance
Clinical ConsiderationsRequires precise placement and torque application; necessitates proper oral hygiene and maintenance

How do Screw Dental Implants Work?

Screw dental implants consist of two main components: the implant fixture and the abutment. Here’s how they work:

  1. Implant Fixture Placement: The implant fixture, typically made of titanium, is surgically placed into the jawbone.
    Over time, the bone fuses with the implant in a process called osseointegration, providing a sturdy foundation for the prosthetic tooth.

  2. Abutment Attachment: Once the implant has fully integrated with the jawbone, an abutment is attached to the implant fixture.
    This abutment serves as a connector between the implant and the prosthetic tooth.

  3. Restoration Attachment: The prosthetic tooth, such as a crown, bridge, or denture, is then attached to the abutment using screws.
    This secure attachment provides stability and functionality similar to natural teeth.

Screw dental implants offer several advantages, including excellent stability, easy maintenance, and versatility in accommodating various restoration types.

However, they require precise placement and torque application during surgery and necessitate proper oral hygiene and maintenance to ensure long-term success.

How to Know if You Need a Screw Dental Implant?

Determining if you need a screw dental implant involves several factors:

  1. Missing Teeth: If you’re missing one or more teeth due to decay, injury, or other reasons, you may be a candidate for screw dental implants.

  2. Bone Density: Adequate bone density in the jaw is crucial to support the implant fixture. Your dentist will assess your bone health through imaging techniques like X-rays or CT scans.

  3. Overall Oral Health: Your dentist will evaluate your oral health to ensure you don’t have any conditions, like gum disease, that could affect the success of the implant.

  4. Treatment Preferences: Some patients may prefer screw-retained implants for their stability and ease of maintenance compared to cement-retained implants.

Difference between Cement Dental Implant and Screw Dental Implants

When comparing cement dental implants to screw dental implants, several key differences should be considered:

  1. Attachment Method:
    • Cement Dental Implants: These implants are attached to the jawbone using dental cement, which is applied to the abutment before seating the crown.

    • Screw Dental Implants: Screw-retained implants use a screw to secure the restoration directly to the implant fixture.
  2. Retrievability:
    • Cement Dental Implants: Once the restoration is cemented in place, it cannot be easily removed without damaging the restoration or surrounding teeth.

    • Screw Dental Implants: Screw-retained restorations are easily retrievable, making them advantageous for maintenance or in case of future complications.
  3. Strength and Stability:
    • Cement Dental Implants: While cement-retained restorations offer good stability, they may not provide the same level of strength as screw-retained restorations.

    • Screw Dental Implants: Screw-retained restorations typically offer greater strength and stability due to the direct mechanical connection between the implant fixture and the restoration.
  4. Maintenance and Repair:
    • Cement Dental Implants: Repairing or replacing cement-retained restorations can be more complex and may require removal of the existing restoration and cement.

    • Screw Dental Implants: Screw-retained restorations are easier to repair or replace as they can be unscrewed without causing damage to the restoration or surrounding teeth.
  5. Aesthetics:
    • Cement Dental Implants: Cement-retained restorations often provide better aesthetics as there is no visible screw access hole on the restoration.

    • Screw Dental Implants: While screw access holes may be visible on screw-retained restorations, they are typically located on the chewing surface and can be minimized for improved aesthetics.
  6. Cost:
    • Cement Dental Implants: Cement-retained restorations may be more cost-effective initially, but they may require more maintenance and repair over time.

    • Screw Dental Implants: Screw-retained restorations may have a higher initial cost, but their retrievability and ease of maintenance can result in long-term cost savings.

Understanding these differences is crucial for patients and dentists when choosing the most suitable type of dental implant for individual cases.

AspectCement Dental ImplantsScrew Dental Implants
Attachment MethodAttached using dental cement.Attached using screws.
RetrievabilityNot easily retrievable without damaging the restoration.Easily retrievable for maintenance or in case of complications.
Strength and StabilityGood stability, but may lack the same level of strength.Greater strength and stability due to direct mechanical connection.
Maintenance and RepairComplex repair or replacement may require removal of existing restoration.Easier repair or replacement as restorations can be unscrewed.
AestheticsProvides better aesthetics with no visible screw access hole.May have visible screw access holes, but can be minimized for aesthetics.
CostInitial cost may be lower, but may require more maintenance over time.Higher initial cost, but potential long-term cost savings due to ease of maintenance.

Average Price of Cement Dental Implant in Kendall Miami

The average price of cement dental implants in Kendall Miami varies depending on several factors, including the dentist’s experience, the materials used, and any additional procedures required. 

However, it’s essential to consider the long-term cost implications beyond just the initial implant placement.

  • Initial Cost: Cement dental implants may have a slightly lower initial cost compared to screw-retained implants due to the simpler attachment method.

  • Additional Costs: However, it’s crucial to account for potential additional costs associated with maintenance and repair over time.

  • Overall Investment: While the upfront cost may be lower, patients should weigh the long-term benefits and potential expenses associated with cement dental implants when considering their investment in tooth replacement options.

It’s recommended to consult with a dental professional to receive a personalized quote based on individual needs and circumstances.

Average Price of Screw Dental Implant in Kendall Miami

The average price of screw dental implants in Kendall Miami can vary based on several factors, including the complexity of the case, the materials used, and the experience of the dentist performing the procedure. 

However, it’s essential to consider the long-term benefits and potential cost savings associated with screw-retained implants.

  • Initial Cost: Screw dental implants may have a slightly higher initial cost compared to cement-retained implants due to the more complex attachment method.

  • Long-term Durability: Screw-retained implants often provide greater long-term stability and durability, potentially reducing the need for future maintenance or replacement.

  • Overall Value: While the upfront cost may be higher, many patients find that the long-term benefits and reduced risk of complications make screw dental implants a worthwhile investment in their oral health.

It’s advisable to consult with a dental professional to receive a personalized quote based on individual needs and treatment plans.

Pros and Cons of Cement Dental Implants vs Screw

When considering dental implants, it’s essential to weigh the pros and cons of both cement-retained and screw-retained options to make an informed decision about the most suitable treatment. 

Here’s a breakdown of the pros and cons of cement dental implants versus screw dental implants:

Pros of Cement Dental Implants:

  • Simplicity: Cement-retained implants involve a straightforward placement process, making them suitable for cases with limited access or space.

  • Esthetics: Cemented crowns can provide excellent esthetic results, with no visible screw access holes on the restoration.

  • Minimal Risk of Screw Loosening: Since cement-retained crowns do not rely on screws for attachment, there is no risk of screw loosening or fracture over time.

Cons of Cement Dental Implants:

  • Difficult Retrieval: If complications arise, such as crown fracture or decay, removing a cemented restoration can be challenging and may require more invasive procedures.

  • Potential for Cement Residue: Improper cement removal can leave residue around the implant, leading to inflammation, tissue irritation, or even peri-implantitis.

  • Limited Adjustability: Cemented restorations offer less adjustability compared to screw-retained crowns, making it more challenging to correct any occlusal discrepancies or fit issues.

Pros of Screw Dental Implants:

  • Retrievability: Screw-retained restorations can be easily removed for maintenance, repairs, or adjustments without causing damage to the implant or surrounding tissues.

  • Enhanced Retention: Screws provide a secure attachment mechanism, minimizing the risk of crown dislodgement or fracture.

  • Adjustability: Screw-retained crowns offer greater flexibility for adjustments to achieve optimal occlusion and fit.

Cons of Screw Dental Implants:

  • Visible Access Hole: The screw access hole on the restoration may compromise esthetics, especially in anterior teeth.

  • Complexity: The screw-retained technique requires additional steps during fabrication and placement, potentially increasing chair time and laboratory costs.

  • Risk of Screw Loosening: Although rare, screw loosening or fracture can occur over time, necessitating maintenance or replacement.

Understanding these pros and cons can help patients and dental professionals choose the most suitable implant retention method based on individual needs and preferences.

Key Takeaways: Dental Implants Cement vs Screw

In summary, when choosing between cement and screw dental implants, it’s essential to consider several factors to determine the best option for your specific needs:

  • Attachment Method: Cement dental implants offer a more straightforward procedure and aesthetic appeal, while screw dental implants provide greater retention and easy removal.

  • Pros and Cons: Cement implants are aesthetically pleasing but may pose challenges during removal, while screw implants offer easy removal but come with visible access holes.

  • Patient Preference: Patients should weigh the pros and cons of each method, considering factors such as aesthetics, ease of removal, and adjustability.

Making an informed decision with the guidance of a qualified dental professional ensures the best outcome for your dental implant procedure.

Conclusion: Cement vs Screw Implants

In conclusion, both cement and screw dental implants offer unique advantages and considerations for patients seeking tooth replacement options. 

While cement implants provide a seamless appearance and straightforward procedure, screw implants offer enhanced retention and ease of removal. 

Ultimately, the choice between cement and screw implants depends on individual patient needs, preferences, and the guidance of a qualified dental professional. 

Artistics Smiles is committed to providing personalized care and helping patients achieve optimal dental health outcomes.

FAQs: Dental Implants Cement vs Screw

What are the advantages of cement-retained implants?

The advantages of cement-retained implants include reduced risk of screw loosening, enhanced esthetics due to absence of screw access holes, and simplified prosthetic fabrication process. 

Studies indicate a high success rate of over 95% for cement-retained implants (Source: Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry).

Is it better to cement or screw dental implants?

The choice between cement and screw dental implants depends on factors like prosthesis design, esthetic requirements, and retrievability preferences. While cement-retained implants offer seamless appearance, screw-retained implants 

What is the disadvantage of cement-retained implant crown?

A disadvantage of cement-retained implant crowns is the potential risk of cement remnants causing peri-implant inflammation or soft tissue irritation, especially if not properly removed during placement.

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As your local family dentist, Dr. Yon Elejabarrieta specializes in providing general dentistry to patients of all ages with the highest level of care.

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As your local family dentist, Dr. Yon Elejabarrieta specializes in providing general dentistry to patients of all ages with the highest level of care.

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